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the-star-stuff:

Hubble to Watch Historic Venus Transit, Using Moon as Mirror
Scientists are planning to use NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to observe next month’s historic transit of Venus across the sun’s face.
But there’s a twist. Researchers can’t point Hubble anywhere near the sun, because our star’s bright light could damage the telescope’s super-sensitive instruments. So Hubble will watch the June 5-6Venus transit by using the moon as a mirror.

Imaged Above: Michael Wilce of Central London, UK took 20 composite shots to create this image of Venus transit on June 8, 2004. CREDIT: Michael Wilce 

the-star-stuff:

Hubble to Watch Historic Venus Transit, Using Moon as Mirror

Scientists are planning to use NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to observe next month’s historic transit of Venus across the sun’s face.

But there’s a twist. Researchers can’t point Hubble anywhere near the sun, because our star’s bright light could damage the telescope’s super-sensitive instruments. So Hubble will watch the June 5-6Venus transit by using the moon as a mirror.

Imaged Above: Michael Wilce of Central London, UK took 20 composite shots to create this image of Venus transit on June 8, 2004. CREDIT: Michael Wilce 

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quantumaniac:

LHCb
Standing for Large Hadron Collider beauty, the LHCb is one of the six particle detector experiments at CERN. One of the primary goals of the detector is to solve the mystery of the Matter-Antimatter symmetry in the universe.
Matter, known as baryonic matter, and anti-matter, likewise known as anti-baryonic matter - are obviously not present in symmetrical amounts in the universe, but current theories says that they should be. When matter and anti-matter collide, they explode and demolish one another in an impressive show - and this should have happened at the beginning of the universe, and the result should have been a matter-less existence. However, baryonic matter prevailed - and the scientists at LHCb hope to determine why.

quantumaniac:

LHCb

Standing for Large Hadron Collider beauty, the LHCb is one of the six particle detector experiments at CERN. One of the primary goals of the detector is to solve the mystery of the Matter-Antimatter symmetry in the universe.

Matter, known as baryonic matter, and anti-matter, likewise known as anti-baryonic matter - are obviously not present in symmetrical amounts in the universe, but current theories says that they should be. When matter and anti-matter collide, they explode and demolish one another in an impressive show - and this should have happened at the beginning of the universe, and the result should have been a matter-less existence. However, baryonic matter prevailed - and the scientists at LHCb hope to determine why.

(Source: quantumaniac)

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the-star-stuff:

Lunar scientists shed light on Moon’s impact history

Analysis shows that craters formed near the Nectaris impact basin were created by projectiles hitting twice as fast as those found on more ancient terrains. By NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California — Published: February 28, 2012

A team of researchers from the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, has discovered that debris that caused a “lunar cataclysm” on the Moon 4 billion years ago struck it at much higher speeds than those that made the most ancient craters. The scientists found evidence supporting this scenario by examining the history of crater formation on the Moon. [Continue Reading…]

the-star-stuff:

Lunar scientists shed light on Moon’s impact history

Analysis shows that craters formed near the Nectaris impact basin were created by projectiles hitting twice as fast as those found on more ancient terrains. By NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CaliforniaPublished: February 28, 2012

A team of researchers from the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, has discovered that debris that caused a “lunar cataclysm” on the Moon 4 billion years ago struck it at much higher speeds than those that made the most ancient craters. The scientists found evidence supporting this scenario by examining the history of crater formation on the Moon. [Continue Reading…]

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the-star-stuff:

Kepler’s Transiting Multiple-Planet Systems

This video provides an overhead view of the multi-planet star systems discovered by the Kepler mission. According to NASA, all the planets — with the exception of the ones labeled in grey — have been officially confirmed.

This video also serves as an good introduction to an exoplanet-hunting technique you may not be familiar with. First, check out the incredible variation in the planets’ orbital periods (how long it takes each planet to make one complete trip around its sun). Since Kepler detects candidate planets by measuring dips in detectable light as one passes in front of — or “transits” — a distant star, having more than one planet in any given star system can give rise to some pretty crazy measurements. 

Planetary Systems video by Dan Fabrycky via NASA